Key dates for women’s rights

Published on : 17 January 20234 min reading time

The following article outlines key dates for women’s rights. It begins by discussing the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, which is considered to be the first organized women’s rights movement in the United States. The article then goes on to discuss the women’s suffrage movement, which culminated in the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920. Finally, the article discusses the modern women’s rights movement, which has made significant progress in recent decades.

The first women’s rights convention is held in Seneca Falls, New York

In 1848, the first women’s rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, New York. The convention was organized by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, and was attended by about 300 people. The participants drafted a “Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions” that called for equal rights for women, including the right to vote. The declaration was modeled on the Declaration of Independence, and was signed by 100 people, both men and women. The convention marked the beginning of the women’s rights movement in the United States.

The National American Woman Suffrage Association is founded

The National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) was founded in 1869 by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. The organization was formed in order to secure women’s right to vote through peaceful, constitutional means. NAWSA was the largest and most influential suffrage organization in the United States, working tirelessly to lobby state and federal government officials in support of women’s suffrage. In 1890, NAWSA merged with another suffrage organization, the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA), to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). The newly formed organization continued the work of its predecessor organizations, and in 1920, the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, granting women the right to vote.

The 19th Amendment is ratified, giving women the right to vote

In August of 1920, the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, giving women the right to vote. This was a culmination of years of campaigning and protesting by women’s rights advocates, who argued that women deserved the same rights and privileges as men. The amendment was a victory for suffragists and a major step forward for women’s rights in the United States. However, it would take many more years before women would achieve true equality in American society.

The Equal Rights Amendment is introduced

In 1923, the Equal Rights Amendment is introduced in Congress for the first time. The ERA is an amendment to the Constitution that would guarantee equal rights for women. It is not ratified by the required number of states, and it is not reintroduced in Congress until 1972. In 1982, the ERA is finally ratified by the required number of states, but it is too late to be added to the Constitution.

The Women’s Strike for Equality takes place

On August 26, 1970, the Women’s Strike for Equality took place in New York City. The strike was organized by Betty Friedan and the National Organization for Women (NOW) to mark the 50th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote. The strikers marched from Fifth Avenue to Bryant Park, where they held a rally. The event was one of the largest protests for women’s rights in U.S. history.

The Equal Rights Amendment is finally ratified

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is finally ratified. The ERA was first proposed in 1923, and though it was passed by Congress in 1972, it failed to gain ratification by the required number of states. In January 2020, Virginia became the 38th and final state needed to ratify the ERA, finally putting the amendment into effect. The ERA prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, and though its ratification is long overdue, it will provide much needed protection for women’s rights.

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